Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Royal Field Artillery Limber and Team.

The Great War Miniatures Limber, team and 18pdr field gun with Woodnine Designs heads ready for service somewhere hot and dusty.



Saturday, 25 July 2015

Scratchbuilt FWD Model B 3 Ton Truck

The last of these scratchbuilds for a while. I must get on with painting and suppress the the urges of my inner twelve year old self and focus on other projects. With the exception of  two pieces of styrene rod and a bit of brass wire, this truck used to be a manilla card wallet!




From what I can find out, 500 of these American FWD trucks were delivered to the British Army who used them primarily as artillery tractors. Some were convereted into fuel tankers, searchlight carriers and balloon tenders.  


Wednesday, 22 July 2015

Another scratchbuilt gun: 6 inch 26cwt howitzer (ish).

More fun with cereal packet cardboard... and swearing. This is a very squat and ugly looking gun. It does not photograph very well. It looks a lot better "in the flesh".
The Batttery Major consults the handbook and thinks about getting the brute dug into an emplacement covered with netting.

An interesting thing came to light while researching the plans of this gun. In May 1917, the most forward battery of these guns on the Ypres Salient was dug in 300 yards west of the Cloth Hall in Ypres. Having stood on the area of the front line of the Salient and looked back towards Ypres I appreciate the distances involved.





Tuesday, 21 July 2015

Scratchbuilt 6 inch heavy gun.

This is a cereal packet and a bit of styrene tube and rod. Thanks for the inspiration must go to Mark (Tin Shed Gamer) over on the LAF. I lifted the template of the carriage from his cereal packet 8 inch Howitzer. His traction engine and gun project can be seen here.

I'm afraid I bottled out of doing spoked wheels. I need to build up my confidence and skill level with this sort of thing before I attempt such a thing.

To give an idea of size, the Battery Major, a Mutton Chop figure, stands along side the finished object. I think I need to give it a name.....





Sunday, 19 July 2015

Friday, 17 July 2015

DIY 1/56 British WW1 4.5 inch Howitzer (ish) 1. The theme of GUNS continues.

I dragged out the Plasticard, the Styrene tube and rods, a bit of brass wire and a pair of GWM wheels from a gash 13pdr in the leadpile and I tried to create something that looks a bit like a 4.5 inch howitzer in 1/56 scale. The idea was NOT to produce an exact replica in miniature but to make a passable model as no one, to my knowlege, makes such a thing in this scale suitable for use with 28mm figures. There are no rivets and fine detail here as such is beyond my limited skills and patience. I just wanted to have a go.

The idea, that had been sitting in back of my mind for quite some time, was given a boot up the backside by two things. Firstly, I've had to put the brushes down for a bit due to some pain in finger joints and wrists (age creeps upon us all unseen) and secondly I found a set of  free 1/72 scale plans by Wayne McCullough for a paper model on the Landships website here (just scroll down to the bottom of the page). Having downloaded the plans and printed them out I took the uncoloured plans, scanned them in to the lap-top and rescaled them from 1/72 to 1/56.  This provided the basis for the carriage and the shield. The barrel was fun to make although the shape of the recuperator beneath it provided some problems but I am pretty pleased with the result.

The piece needs a bit of cleaning up here and there which will happen before I paint it, but I thought I'd let you all see the raw, unpainted result of  four hours cutting and sticking.




 Here it is alongside a GWM 18pdr for comparison.
So much for resting the hands. Far better than sitting on them or just twidling the thumbs!

Saturday, 11 July 2015

HLBSCo WW1 8 inch Howitzer and 60 pdr field gun.

Big guns!

The brooding shape of the all metal 8 inch howitzer model. Some wag has named her "Ruby" after his wife!





 The resin 60 pdr model.





Wednesday, 8 July 2015

Interwar USMC 75mm Field Gun.

Some heavy support for the USMC figures painted earlier this year. A GWM WW1 French 75mm field gun with a crew of GWM Late War British Artillery crew with Woodbine Designs headswaps. Strictly speaking, by the 1920s American guns had a simple Olive Green paint scheme but the decision was taken to give the gun a bit more "umph"  by basing the paint scheme on a gun in the Lovett Artillery Collection. An image of this gun appears at the bottom of this page and the other images and information can be found here. A second gun and crew are currently on the table.




French 75mm gun, Lovett Artillery Collection.

UPDATE
An image of both comleted guns and crews.

And next? BIG GUNS!



Thursday, 2 July 2015